The Digital Exhibition – Considered in the Long Term

Authors

  • Susan Hazan Israel Museum, Jerusalem

Abstract

This chapter will draw on the traditional museum visit to consider whether, in an age of digital reproduction, end-users encountering digital exhibitions have similarly rich experiences that could be comparable to those of visitors to a physical museum.

Author Biography

Susan Hazan, Israel Museum, Jerusalem

Dr. Susan Hazan, in her role as Curator of New Media and Head of the Internet Office at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, is responsible for identifying, and implementing digital solutions for the gallery, online and mobile platforms, and outreach programs. Her Masters and PhD at Goldsmiths College, (2004) University of London in Media and Communications focused on electronic architectures in the contemporary museum. Hazan has been recognized for her numerous publications on new media in education, art, museums and cultural heritage, and is currently investigating social networks, innovative platforms for disseminating virtual museums, and digital libraries in the context of cultural heritage. Hazan has been invited to teach at various universities including the Computing Department at Goldsmiths and the University of London, teaching Web Design and Critical E-Museology with an emphasis on the correlation between cultural theory and contemporary practice. Hazan is the Israel Coordinator of the World Summit Award (WSA), and Co-Chair of EVA/Minerva, the Annual Jerusalem Conference on the Digitisation of Cultural Heritage (2004-2015). She has been on numerous program committees including Museums and the Web (2001-2015), VSMM (2005, 2009, 2012), and PATCH (2012-2014). Hazan is an Australian Research Council (ARC) reviewer and sits on the New Media Consortium (2010-2014) Horizon Report: Museum Edition Advisory Board. Her publication list may be found at http://www.musesphere.com/about/Susan.Hazan.html

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Published

2015-06-13

How to Cite

Hazan, S. (2015). The Digital Exhibition – Considered in the Long Term. Uncommon Culture, 6(11), 12–19. Retrieved from https://uncommonculture.org/ojs/index.php/UC/article/view/6069